The Oldest Pubs in North Cornwall

The Oldest Pubs in North Cornwall

Summer or winter, no holiday would be complete without a drink or meal in the local pub. Fortunately, North Cornwall is overflowing with characterful pubs with some boasting extensive histories, roots embedded in centuries long-gone. To get acquainted, take a browse of our list of the oldest pubs in North Cornwall and enjoy a drink, a chat and a whole load of atmosphere.

The Old Inn, St Breward, 11th Century

In the running as Cornwall’s oldest pub, the appropriately-named Old Inn in St Breward positively exudes history. Hiding all manner of tales betwixt its walls, the pub has been welcoming loyal locals, passing tradesmen and hungry travellers for a millennium – which is pretty extraordinary to get your head around! Step inside and drink up the atmosphere; it’ll be hard not to be impressed.

The Crown Inn, Lanlivery, 12th Century

Another pub boasting proud historical pedigree, the Crown Inn in Lanlivery dates as far back as the 12th Century. Home to all the wonderful features you could ask for in a historic pub, the interiors are a melting pot of wonky ceilings, exposed beams, stone floors and original feature walls. For more intrigue, you can even see the pub’s original bread oven in the main bar.

Treguth Inn, Holywell Bay, 13th Century

The 13th Century thatched Treguth Inn is an attractive pub sat above Holywell Bay. Once a farmstead and a tearoom before becoming a public house, the pub is also reputed to be one of the most haunted pubs in Cornwall. Among the mysterious goings-on, there have been numerous claims of shadowy figures, as well as the presence of two troubled souls – a Welshman called David Kerrow who died in 1580, and a lady called Eleanor who died in the 1300’s.

The Bush Inn, Morwenstow, 13th Century

Whether you are sipping a cool G&T in their beer garden in summer or huddling up next to the woodfire in winter, the Bush Inn in Morwenstow is a great spot for a drink overlooking the Atlantic. Dating back to the 13th Century, you can lose yourself in the romance of the place as you peruse the menu ready for some home-cooked grub and enjoy adding your footsteps to the dance of time.

St Kew Inn, St Kew, 15th Century

Built alongside the construction of a local church, St Kew Inn was intended to provide refuge (and a tipple or two) for stone mason’s working nearby. Dating back to the 15th Century, it’s believed that the cellar of the pub is where the masons set up their own brewery. Needless to say, beers are much more palatable these days! Pop in for a warm welcome and hearty repast throughout the year.

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